thescienceofreality:

#YesAllWomen tweets reveal persistent sexism in science By Fiona MacDonald via ScienceAlert. | Image Credit: First three images via ScienceAlert via Twitter, fourth image via Twitter.

Reading through the tweets on the #yesallwomen hashtag is heartbreaking, illuminating and frustrating all at the same time. 

And if you’re a woman, you’ll be nodding along to nine out of 10 of them.

The hashtag started after it was revealed that 22-year-old Elliot Rodger, lead suspect in the Isla Vista shooting, had shared extremely disturbing and misogynistic views in a video posted shortly before the attack.

Instead of flooding the internet with Rodger-specific fury, Twitter took the discussion to the next level and remind the world that sexism is still very much present across society, and #YesAllWomen experience it.

Among those tweets were many honest and confronting admissions of sexism from female scientists, students and communicators.

This isn’t the first time the issue of misogyny in science has been brought up, but it’s always sad and shocking to see certain opinions persist when females have come such a long way in the field.

As ScienceAlert is staffed almost entirely by women, we though we’d add a few of our own:

Because only 44 out of 835 Nobel Prize laureates are women.

Because senior scientists would still rather hire males, and pay them more.

Because people are still shocked when we tell them ScienceAlert is run by women.

Because that last tweet I screenshotted, via Hannah Hart, really hits home for myself and so many women I’ve talked to over the last few days [much less ever] when it comes to pointing out sexism in general, especially within the STEM world. 

radbabyradfem:

~real men don’t abuse women~

In actual fact,

  1. yep, they fucking do
  2. being a real man is associated with masculinity, and masculinity fuels violence against women, so yes again men abuse women
  3. campaigns like this prioritise the preservation of masculinity before the safety of women

kastland:

parenting

Sometimes, when I start to feel bad about my decisions, this makes me laugh and feel better…

mads-next-meal:

If you’re on the journey towards self-love and self-acceptance, I am very proud of you. You’re doing great. Never stop believing in yourself and remember that it is okay to have a bad day.

perfectvic:

LITERALLY MY FAVORITE

perfectvic:

LITERALLY MY FAVORITE

thefrogman:

The MRAs are outraged.
Not because a violent misogynist killed people.
They are outraged that people had the nerve to blame their influence. This young man took to heart many of their philosophies. He was taught that if his perceived entitlement was not fulfilled, it justified his behavior. 
I’m filled with such saddening disappointment. A huge wake up call was shot across the bow of all men, and many of us seem only concerned with deflecting blame.
This “outrage” post is stickied to the top of the forum. That is their top priority. 
It does not occur to them that maybe their first priority should be to condemn this behavior—to say that using violence as a response to rejection is not okay. 
Your mothers, your sisters, your daughters… they are frightened. Just saying “no” is a fearful prospect.
That is not okay.
But instead of worrying about them, all you seem to care about is not being blamed.
You say not all men are monsters?
Imagine a bowl of M&Ms. 10% of them are poisoned.
Go ahead. Eat a handful.
Not all M&Ms are poison. 

thefrogman:

The MRAs are outraged.

Not because a violent misogynist killed people.

They are outraged that people had the nerve to blame their influence. This young man took to heart many of their philosophies. He was taught that if his perceived entitlement was not fulfilled, it justified his behavior. 

I’m filled with such saddening disappointment. A huge wake up call was shot across the bow of all men, and many of us seem only concerned with deflecting blame.

This “outrage” post is stickied to the top of the forum. That is their top priority. 

It does not occur to them that maybe their first priority should be to condemn this behavior—to say that using violence as a response to rejection is not okay. 

Your mothers, your sisters, your daughters… they are frightened. Just saying “no” is a fearful prospect.

That is not okay.

But instead of worrying about them, all you seem to care about is not being blamed.

You say not all men are monsters?

Imagine a bowl of M&Ms. 10% of them are poisoned.

Go ahead. Eat a handful.

Not all M&Ms are poison. 

evansvictoria:

This isn’t really part of the series I mentioned doing yesterday but just a little doodle I decided to really quickly paint.

evansvictoria:

This isn’t really part of the series I mentioned doing yesterday but just a little doodle I decided to really quickly paint.

theplaceinsidetheblizzard:

Fellow survivors who engage in non-con or rape-play as part of coping or healing, I respect you even if I struggle to understand why you do it.

I will never tell you that you are wrong, or sick or broken. I won’t police your response to trauma or your healing process.

But please don’t expect me to be anything less than ambivalent towards your non-survivor sexual partners who engage in rape play with you.

I am downright suspicious and even hostile towards non-survivors who engage in rape-play and your partner/s are not exempt from that.

Please do not police my feelings on this.

It might not feel nice that I am hostile towards your partner/s, but that does not reflect on you and I am not interested in being made to feel guilty for this.

Being suspicious of your partner =/= being suspicious of you.

840px:

life hack: remember to compliment people on qualities other than their looks. remind them of their kindness, thoughtfulness, and intelligence. tell them about how powerful and capable they are.